Saturday, July 5, 2014

inSPIREd Sunday





May 2010 - London England

We visited on a Sunday so no sightseers are allowed inside. Note to self - next time go during the week. But then again photography is forbidden at any time.
There is a steep entrance fee of £ 15 if bought online, more if you buy at the door. The cathedral does not receive any government funding.





St Paul's Cathedral, London, is a Church of England cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits at the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest point in the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604. The present church, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed within Wren's lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme which took place in the city after the Great Fire of London.

I found this amazing aerial view online.


The cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognizable sights of London, with its dome, framed by the spires of Wren's City churches, dominating the skyline for 300 years. At 365 feet (111 m) high, it was the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1962, and its dome is also among the highest in the world. In terms of area, St Paul's is the second largest church building in the United Kingdom after Liverpool Cathedral.
St Paul's Cathedral has been the scene of some great events in British history: the funeral of Winston Churchill, the Diamond Jubilee celebrations of Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth 11, the funeral of Wellington, bombing during the blitz in the Second World War.

The iconic St Paul's Survives taken on 29 December 1940 of St Paul's during the Blitz






Resting on an unusually warm London day.


Here Queen Victoria returned thanks to almighty God for the sixtieth anniversary of her accession. June 22 A.D. 1897.








4 comments:

  1. A magnificent church, and so much history to it! Wow!

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  2. wow, that place is huge. i love the clock. a very historical area. ( :

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  3. Wow! Quite impressive. Tom THe Backroads Traveller

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  4. I refused to pay that much to go in so like you took lots of pics outside!

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