Saturday, August 9, 2014

inSPIREd Sunday




October 2013 - Toronto ON

Taken at Black Creek Village.

Fisherville Church 1856
Original Location: Fisherville, Ontario (Dufferin Avenue and Steeles Avenue)

The Fisherville Church is an excellent example of the Greek Revival architectural style so popular in the middle of the 19th century. It is timber frame, wood sheathing, and has batten finish. The church was located originally at the corner of Steeles Avenue and Dufferin Street and named after Jacob Fisher who donated the land on which it was built. Designed with large windows to allow in the maximum amount of light, the church provided a place for local families to gather for worship in the box pews. The Fisherville Church was Presbyterian until 1925 when the congregation voted to join the United Church of Canada. Moved in one piece to Black Creek Pioneer Village in 1960 and restored for opening in 1962, the church still has many weddings performed in it every year.




The Manse 1835 
Original Location: Richmond Hill, Ontario (on Yonge Street)

This building is neo-classic in style and typical of the small houses built in Ontario villages in the 1830s. Its construction is rare with walls of plank-on-plank construction consisting of 2 x 6" boards nailed one on top of the other. Every other plank is offset to produce a keying effect for the plastered interior and stuccoed exterior. The building was used by Rev. James Dick, as manse to the Richmond Hill Presbyterian Church, from 1849 until his death in 1885. From that time the building was used as a store, residence, Sunday School and office. The Manse was a fitting complement to the Fisherville Presbyterian Church which had been moved to Black Creek Pioneer Village and reopened in 1961. The Manse was moved in two pieces to Black Creek on October 7, 1978.



4 comments:

  1. What a lovely find! I will have to visit Black Creek Pioneer Village someday. Have a lovely day. Tom

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  2. Those are awesome buildings. I love how they moved the first one instead of tearing it down.

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  3. it has a bank feeling to it. what a neat design. so old. ( :

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  4. So much history in churches like these.

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