Friday, November 21, 2014

Sepia Saturday


Sepia Saturday



The title of this old photograph - which comes from the Flickr Commons stream of the National Archives of Estonia - is "Eveline Maydell making a silhouette, with her models. Indianapolis 1931" Eveline Adelheid von Maydell (1890 - 1962) was a German-born silhouette artist who lived in the USA from 1922 onwards. She was described as being ambidextrous : a Milwaukee newspaper article from 1942 said "she sketches and designs with her left hand and with her right snips with minute scissors the silhouettes..." Sepians also need to be ambidextrous - composing words with their left hand whilst assessing old images with their right - and we invite you to contribute all these skills to your contributions for Sepia Saturday 255. Just post your post on or around Saturday 22 November and then (unlike some idiot who forgot last week) link the post to the Sepia Saturday Linky List below. What could be easier than that. Before you start snipping away, take a look at what is to come in the weeks ahead.

I'm pretty stumped on coming up with a photo. But, I can rise to the challenge with SNIPS of paper that my mother had collected in the family treasure box of memories.

This doesn't have a date but in researching I found that bacon for 79 cents would have been mid 1960s.


This envelope for photo processing has to be early 1960s based on the address. I was looking at the phone number RE 7 (above Berke's Pharmacy) and realized that RE stood for REGENT. Phone numbers were a 2 Letter 5 Digits since the 1950s. Bell Canada used the codes for central offices (exchanges) where switches are located. The area served by a central office is a wire centre.

RE was replaced by 73 in the late 60s and my parents had their 73 phone number until they passed away in 1990.

Other codes I remember are 27 CR Crescent, 84 VI Victor, 68 MU Murray.


This is 1970.



Mom's notes on her last trip to Ireland in 1989.


12 comments:

  1. A nice take on snippets of life. I loved the line "portraits de bebes notre specialite" on the pharmacy envelope !

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    1. I remember that my family's phone number changed from FAculty to 32.

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  2. Isn’t it strange the mix of snippets people collect? I found the same with my family; why save bills and receipts for so long I wonder? I’m glad they did though.

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  3. Isn't it funny to be able to date something by the style of phone number? I remember when our number changed from "EX" (for Export) to "39."

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  4. And ours was PA 5-2830...the PA was for "Parkview," and my mother had that phone number until she died in 2010.

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  5. I always find it interesting the things that people save. When my Grandmother died and we cleaned out her apartment, she had every card and letter anyone had ever sent her, I kid you not!

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  6. Our phone # went from LA (for landscape) 5, to 525 when I was growing up. I've had 8 different phone numbers over the years (including my cell). I remember the Landscape number, & the last number before we moved to our present location. The rest have fled my memory. As for the clippings, I remember those film sizes circled because I had cameras using them. As to the grocery prices in the '60s - I think I've mentioned before I could go to the market with a dollar & come home with a pound of hamburger, a loaf of bread, a quart of milk, & a couple of carrots & still have change left over. Those were the days!

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  7. Very clever. I have difficulty remembering why I save bits of paper. Maybe I should keep notes about each one.

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  8. A truly original contribution to this week's theme. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it.

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  9. These days we just toss old receipts away and would never dream of keeping them.But then they are just till rolls!

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  10. What a great idea to follow those old codes and know the dates...thanks for putting this post together!

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